Who could say no to a quick tour of polyester’s unusual start?

Hi! To all our followers! As always, I’m your commercial fabrics guy, eager to drop a few lines about truly interesting textile process and procedure concepts.

Correct my friend, this is your commercial fabrics guy, and I have yet another textiles historic insight to send your way. Are you new?? Great!! Hello! Roger Howard here, I’m your intrepid author, eager to get into all we’ve found today.

2-inch webbing roll is what I’m all about, so it may be a bit of a surprise to you that I only uncovered a few cool things of interest: polyester distributor and web distributor.

Just a quick note — let me explain — today’s insights come from experts’ posts that my assistant and I uncovered in today’s careful examination of the “Interwebs”.

Truth be told, the information we found today will be of great interest to those who love posts with lots of details in the world of commercial science.

While I’m thinking of it, would you rather see videos? No problem! I’m building a list of relevant videos that will give a bit more depth and insight to commercial fabric manufacturing processes, and plan to include those in my posts in the coming days.

Let’s be honest, I prefer the written word (because I like to study this type of material line by line, and take notes on how I’ll add new options for our clients’ real-world webbing applications!).

Let me be honest, my friends, we have even more to share on our main site. When you’re ready for better details, take a peek here: cool example to read full article.

Did you know our humble polyester molecule dates back nearly 100 years??

Hi! To all our followers! As always, I’m your commercial fabrics guy, eager to drop a few lines about truly interesting textile process and procedure concepts.

Your compatriot Roger Howard here writing clever insights for you — indeed, I am the prolific commercial fabrics guy) — and ready to share amazin textiles data with you!

Correct my friend, this is your commercial fabrics guy, and I have yet another textiles historic insight to send your way. Are you new?? Great!! Hello! Roger Howard here, I’m your intrepid author, eager to get into all we’ve found today.

1.5 inch seat belt webbing is what we’ve worked on all these years, so it may seem odd that I only found two topics of interest today: material polyester and strap polyester.

Before I go too far — let me explain — today’s insights come from experts’ posts that my assistant and I uncovered in today’s careful examination of the “Interwebs”.

Truth be told, the information we found today will be of great interest to those who love posts with lots of details in the world of commercial science.

Listen, would you rather see videos? No problem! I’m building a list of relevant videos that will give a bit more depth and insight to commercial fabric manufacturing processes, and plan to include those in my posts in the coming days.

To be clear, I prefer the written word (because I like to study this type of material line by line, and take notes on how I’ll add new options for our clients’ real-world webbing applications!).

Let me be honest, my friends, we have even more to share on our primary site. When you’re ready for better details, take a peek here: 1.5 inch seat belt webbing.

Without further delay, here is what I am eager to share today. This article provides great background and insight to the science behind 1 inch web material:

Durability and strength of the material make it a sought after option for many businesses across the globe. Simple things, like the way the woven material can be preshrunk during the manufacturing process makes it a valuable asset to business that require a fabric with consistently non-shrinking properties.
Allergy sufferers love polyester fabric for its non-allergic properties. In fact, many people prefer the material for making quilts, pillows, bed sheets (among other uses) for this target audience that is willing to pay more to get the relief they need in hypoallergenic materials.

Source: http://textilesblogs.blogspot.com/ /2016/05/whats-most-effective-way-to-make.html

Recent Research Confirms All Of This: It’s No Secret That… Manufacturing Processes Are Critical for Polyester Polymerization.
Initial Fabrication

A catalyst is mixed with ethylene glycol and dimethyl terephthalate at a temperature of 150-210 degrees centigrade. The resulting substance is then combined with terephthalic acid. It is allowed to boil at a temperature of 280 degrees centigrade where it forms polyester which is in liquid form. The liquid is allowed to pass through a machine that makes the filaments, tow, fiberfill or staple.

Drying

The liquid polyester ribbons are allowed to cool until hard enough. They are then cut into tiny pieces to ensure that no air was trapped in the filament during the manufacturing process.

Spinning

Melting of the chips is done at 260-270 degree centigrade, and the resulting solution passes through a spinneret which is metallic and has tiny holes. The holes are of various sizes and forms’ depending on what the company is looking to achieve. It is during this process that different chemicals are added for instance those that will make the final product non-flammable.

After the spinning process is complete, the fiber is allowed to dry. Specialized machines do the draw of fiber. The fibers are soft, and it is at this stage that texturing, twisting and other processes take place. The fiber is then packaged into a form that it will be easier to weave it into the desired material.

The manufacturing process of tow is quite different from that of filament manufacture.in that the spinneret machine has smaller holes. The tow fiber that is produced is stored in containers which are specifically for cooling. With technology advancements and the fact that polyester blends easily with natural materials like cotton, wool among others makes it the best choice for many fashion designers.

Correct my friends, our team first shared this detailed history on our Blogspot account, so feel free to visit our site and read that real version from which this came.

Polyester Historical Notes – Read more here -> 1.5 inch seat belt webbing

When politicians fight people tune-in

Darling readers!2-inch webbing roll is actually on my mind, and right now I (Roger Howard, of course!) bring you yet another very-nearly-brilliant post on narrow material my aim being to serve you with various awesome reads and connect you with some great resources.

* BUT * before we get into all that … I have a hot political segment to publish!

And you’ve in all probability * never * come across one such as this … because when politicians fight people tune-in. I’m describing more than just furious words. The dudes in this circumstance are buddies; you’ll see exactly how they had a go toe-to-toe in this brawl …

I tuned into this because one of the two was my director back in the day when I first got out of college. So if perhaps you have enthusiasm in political malicious talk and insider news, then read on.

Yep, high stakes, high tension, legislative concerns concentrated on commercial cargo ships:

“How the Harbor District Found Itself in the Middle of Humboldt’s Most Bitter Political Fight


Author: Ryan Burns
Source: https://lostcoastoutpost.com/2016/apr/29/how-harbor-district-found-itself-center-countys-mo/

Last week, two elected officials got into a face-to-face, toe-to-toe, “let’s take this outside”-style argument during a break in a Planning Commission meeting. This wasn’t a personal beef (the men each told the Outpost afterward that they consider each other friends). Nor was it about a property dispute that affects either man directly.

No, the spat boiled over from a long-simmering political dispute over management of Humboldt Bay. Former Planning Commissioner Dennis Mayo and current Harbor Commissioner Richard Marks (the officials in last week’s quarrel) stand on separate sides of a philosophical and tactical divide that has gradually expanded to define Humboldt County’s most bitter political struggle — whether we should wait for big, blue-collar industries to arrive on our shores via sea and rail, or start allowing other businesses to use that land.

With a 5-1 vote the Planning Commission sided with the Mayo contingent, which envisions Humboldt Bay as a major industrialized seaport offering international shipping and a rebuilt (or freshly built) railroad connecting our county to the national rail network.

Marks and his fellow Harbor Commissioners, meanwhile, are pursuing a more economically diversified approach. At last week’s meeting, Division 5 Commissioner Patrick Higgins told the Planning Commission that the Harbor District almost went broke trying to market our harbor to industrial shipping interests. The time has come, he said, to loosen zoning restrictions on the vacant and deteriorating land surrounding the bay so other types of businesses can move in.

The ultimate decision on this matter lies with the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors, which will have to decide which side of that political chasm to stand on. And while their decision might not dictate the future of Humboldt Bay, it could have significant impacts on property owners and infrastructure around the harbor.

Yes indeed, there is much more where that came from.

Now — jumping ahead to things related to my favorite topic (web distributor) — check this out ->>

In our nerd rating range of 1-10,
this is clearly an 11!

Strangely enough, only a few of you will love this as deeply as do I.
None the less, suffice to say, this is at the deep end of the scientific pool.

Truth be told, the scientists featured here are personal friends of our company in general, and me in particular. By all means, take a few minutes to read through these and let us know if your business works in a realm that can leverage this approach.

Modifying the UV Blocking Effect of Polyester Fabric
Source: http://trj.sagepub.com/content/74/6/469.short

Marija Gorenšek
Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, Department of Textiles, University of Ljubljana, SI-1001 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Franci Sluga
Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, Department of Textiles, University of Ljubljana, SI-1001 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Abstract

The influence of conventional acid and alkaline high temperature dyeing procedures on fabric construction is investigated. The effects of weave construction, orange, red, and blue disperse dyes, double layers of fabrics, and UV absorber on the ultraviolet protection factors (UPF) of polyester fabrics are the topics of this research. A spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere is used to measure the uv transmittance of polyester fabrics according to an AATCC test. Small differences in the weight of fabrics after blind dyeing procedures already influence the uv transmittance of fabrics. Pale orange and blue dyed fabrics show a high enough UPF, while a pale red dyed fabric does not reach such values. Deep dyed and double layered fabrics and fabrics aftertreated with a UV absorber reach high UPF values.

. . .

“Influence of reactive dyes on ultraviolet protection of cotton knitted fabrics with different fabric constructions

Source: http://trj.sagepub.com/content/86/5/512.abstract

Wai-yin Wong, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Jimmy Kwok-cheong Lam, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Chi-wai Kan, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Ron Postle, School of Chemistry, University of New South Wales, Australia

Dr Chi-wai Kan, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong. Email: tccwk [at] polyu.edu.hk

Abstract
Influence of reactive dyes on ultraviolet protection of cotton knitted fabrics with different fabric constructions

Wai-yin Wong1
Jimmy Kwok-cheong Lam1
Chi-wai Kan1⇑
Ron Postle2

1Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
2School of Chemistry, University of New South Wales, Australia

Dr Chi-wai Kan, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong. Email: tccwk [at] polyu.edu.hk

Abstract

The influence of coloration on ultraviolet (UV) protection of cotton knitted fabrics with different knit structures incorporated with the three major stitch types, namely knit, tuck and miss stitches, are studied in four approaches.

The effects of color depth and knit structures on the ultraviolet protection factor (UPF) of fabrics are investigated. The influences of hue and color depth on the UPF of fabrics are also compared. Since UV protection offered by dyes mainly depends on their chemical structures, the UPF and color strength of fabrics colored by reactive dyes that varied in reactive groups, such as mono-functional and bi-functional reactive dyes, are examined. The correlations between UPF and the CIELAB color coordinates, color strength (K/Ssum), are analyzed. The results show that light-colored fabrics with compact structures achieve similar or even better UV protection than the dark-colored fabrics with loose structures.

This implies that color property might not be a reliable indicator for UV protection of knitted fabrics and the effect of coloration on UV protection is affected by fabric construction. The results also denote that the chemical structure of reactive dyes affects the UV protection of fabrics in a qualitative approach that depends on the unique ultraviolet radiation blocking ability of the chemical constituents. Among the color coordinates investigated, only lightness (L*) and K/Ssum are found to be correlated with the UPF of the fabrics, but the strength of correlations is not very strong. This is because the fabric characteristics that have significant impacts of UV protection are mostly not involved in the measurement of color properties.

There are more for 2-inch webbing roll. If You interested click on the 2-inch webbing roll.

What’s the most effective way to make polyester? Check it out…

Amazingly, you guessed it, this is your commercial fabrics guy, and I have yet another compelling textiles post to lay on you. For those who’re new: Hello! Roger Howard here, I’m your intrepid author, eager to get into all we’ve found today.

Narrow fabric seat belt web is what we’ve worked on all these years, so it may be a bit of a surprise to you that I only uncovered a few cool things of interest this afternoon: industrial strap and web strapping.

Before I go too far — let me explain — today’s insights come from experts’ posts that my assistant and I uncovered in our morning surf of the web. In fact, the information we found today will be of great interest to those who love posts with lots of details in the scientific arena.

Believe it or not, we have even more to share on our branded site. When you’re ready for better details, take a peek here: Read more info.

Hey, do you prefer to watch videos? No problem! I’m building a list of relevant videos that will give a bit more depth and insight to commercial fabric manufacturing processes, and plan to include those in my posts in the coming days.

To be honest, I prefer the written word (because I like to study this type of material line by line, and take notes on how I’ll add new options for our clients’ real-world webbing applications!).

Without further delay, here is what I am eager to share today. This article provides great background and insight to the science behind narrow seat belt webbing:

https://www.igotbiz.com/rosemontbelt

Correct indeed, I originally shared this detailed history on our Blogspot account, so feel free to visit our site and read the original info.

Polyester material creation overview

A strong woven fabric was needed by the industrial corporations at the turn of the century. The demand was loud and clear for a product based on a versatile component that could be reliably used in manufacturing and cargo transportation.

Today we know that most modern webbing is made of synthetic fibers such as polyester, but try to remember that is was not always that way. Cotton webbing and wool webbing used to be quite common. However, growing industries cried out for webbing that was both light and strong, with high breaking strengths suitable to all their needs.

Science and technology opened a door to a new molecule that clearly met all the needs of the market.

Polyester industry dates back in the 1920s when W.H. Carothers was contracted by the U.S. based company E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. to research large molecules and synthetic fibers. The research led to the discovery of nylon fabric. In the 1930s to early 1940s, Calico Printers Association and Co., a British owned company, further studied the work of W.H. Carothers and discovered ethylene, which paved the way to creation of polyester fibers.

E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. bought the rights to produce the fiber in the U.S.A. and renamed it Dacron. The company carried out extensive research and came up with different and diverse polyester fibers. The polyester industry has evolved over the years and has many varied uses. There are two types of polyester, namely PET (polyethylene terephthalate), PCDT (poly-1,4-cyclohexylene-dimethylene terephthalate).

Here Are The Ways Polyester Is Put Into Use: Read more info