Take 1 minute to see effective polyester applications…

One quick “FYI” — let me explain — today’s excerpts come from experts’ references that our team found in our morning surf online. Hey, the information we found today will be of great interest to those who love posts has tons of info in our favorite scientific arenas.

We have even more — let me be honest, my friends — to share on our primary site. So if you’d love better detailed content, then take a peek here: check it out.

Perfect, we can now begin:

Yes, Roger Howard writing to you (indeed, I am the long-winded commercial fabrics guy), and prepared with interesting textiles content today for you-all!

1 1/2 inch seat belt webbing is what we’ve worked on all these years, so it may seem odd that I only found two topics of interest this afternoon: narrow material and web strapping.

As always, if you prefer to watch videos, that’s no problem! I’m building a list of relevant videos that will give a bit more depth and insight to commercial fabric manufacturing processes, and plan to include those in my posts in the coming days.

I have to say that I prefer the written word (because I like to study this type of material line by line, and take notes on how I’ll add new options for our clients’ real-world webbing applications!).

So let’s dive in, okay, here is what I am eager to share today. This article provides great background and insight to the science behind 1 1/2 inch seat belt webbing:

It’s just the way it is in the industrial strap commercial enterprise that business owners like us ought to network and build out our connections each and every week. I was at our neighborhood Chamber of Commerce conference last month and met an entrant recently relocated from the west coast. He’s recently performed directly with industrial strap matters in the American Fiber Manufacturers Association, Inc. (AFMA).

I must confess — to be sincere — that I never knew about the American Fiber Manufacturers Association (humiliating, yes, I know). So it seemed like a perfect opportunity to share an overview with you all (on the outside chance that a few of you may be curious about the AFMA as was I).

check it out

When was the last time you pondered the origins of the polyester molecule?

Salutations! To all my bestfollowers! As always, I’m your commercial fabrics guy, eager to drop a few lines about truly interesting textile process and procedure concepts.

Your colleague Roger Howard here writing clever insights for you — yes, the prolific commercial fabrics guy) — and ready to share amazin textiles data with you!

Correct my friend, I am your commercial fabrics guy, and I have yet another textiles historic insight to send your way. Are you new?? Great!! Hello! Roger Howard here, I’m your intrepid author, eager to get into all we’ve found today.

1 inch web material is what I know and love, so it may be a bit of a surprise to you that I only uncovered a few cool things of interest: material polyester and web distributor.

Just a quick note — let me explain — today’s insights come from experts’ posts that my assistant and I uncovered in today’s careful examination of the “Interwebs”.

Truth be told, the information we found today will be of great interest to those who love posts with lots of details in the world of commercial science.

Listen, would you rather see videos? No problem! I’m building a list of relevant videos that will give a bit more depth and insight to commercial fabric manufacturing processes, and plan to include those in my posts in the coming days.

To be clear, I prefer the written word (because I like to study this type of material line by line, and take notes on how I’ll add new options for our clients’ real-world webbing applications!).

Let me be honest, my friends, we have even more to share on our branded site. When you’re ready for better details, click this little link: link right here.

Without further delay, here is what I am eager to share today. This article provides great background and insight to the science behind two-inch seat belt webbing material:

Durability and strength of the material make it a sought after option for many businesses across the globe. Simple things, like the way the woven material can be preshrunk during the manufacturing process makes it a valuable asset to business that require a fabric with consistently non-shrinking properties.
Allergy sufferers love polyester fabric for its non-allergic properties. In fact, many people prefer the material for making quilts, pillows, bed sheets (among other uses) for this target audience that is willing to pay more to get the relief they need in hypoallergenic materials.

->> Original Content Body

Citation: http://textilesblogs.blogspot.com/
Here’s An Idea Worth Considering ->> What Is Involved In Product Creation Is Vital To Effectively Polymerizing Polyester.

Initial Fabrication

A catalyst is mixed with ethylene glycol and dimethyl terephthalate at a temperature of 150-210 degrees centigrade. The resulting substance is then combined with terephthalic acid. It is allowed to boil at a temperature of 280 degrees centigrade where it forms polyester which is in liquid form. The liquid is allowed to pass through a machine that makes the filaments, tow, fiberfill or staple.

Drying

The liquid polyester ribbons are allowed to cool until hard enough. They are then cut into tiny pieces to ensure that no air was trapped in the filament during the manufacturing process.

Spinning

Melting of the chips is done at 260-270 degree centigrade, and the resulting solution passes through a spinneret which is metallic and has tiny holes. The holes are of various sizes and forms’ depending on what the company is looking to achieve. It is during this process that different chemicals are added for instance those that will make the final product non-flammable.

After the spinning process is complete, the fiber is allowed to dry. Specialized machines do the draw of fiber. The fibers are soft, and it is at this stage that texturing, twisting and other processes take place. The fiber is then packaged into a form that it will be easier to weave it into the desired material.

The manufacturing process of tow is quite different from that of filament manufacture.in that the spinneret machine has smaller holes. The tow fiber that is produced is stored in containers which are specifically for cooling. With technology advancements and the fact that polyester blends easily with natural materials like cotton, wool among others makes it the best choice for many fashion designers.

You are right that our team first posted this detailed history on our Blogspot account, so feel free to visit our site and read that real version from which this came.

More Than A Century Ago Polyester Came Into Our Lives:
>> link right here

Have you ever wondered how planning commissions take decisions?

Listen, just before we get into everything … I must give you the overview of what we’re covering in this segment this time.

The 3 stories detailed out below are from three different authors, who come from three very different perspectives, and no love is lost between these guys. When I say they do not get along is a serious understatement, okay?!

At long last, let’s get into it!

My precious followers! 2-inch webbing roll is certainly on my brain, and at present I (Roger Howard, of course!) bring you yet one other very-nearly-brilliant article on material polyester my purpose being to serve you with a number of awesome reads and connect you with various terrific resources.

And you’ve probably never witnessed one such as this … because while it comes to polyester, these author show up from very divergent backgrounds.

I’m describing more than solely ill-tempered debates. The dudes in this case are NOT buddies. In fact, you’ll soon see exactly how their styles are driven by various business needs, and are written from wildly different business goals.

I tuned into this due to the fact that one of the authors was certainly my trainer back in the day when I first got out of university. So if quite possibly you have enthusiasm in political gossip and insider news, then connect with me on Linkedin and I’ll share all the gory details.

Uh-huh, high stakes, high stress, profit concerns focused on industrial drive things like this:

Article #1: History Of Fibre Development
By Gaurav Doshi
Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Gaurav_Doshi/56873

Different kinds of fibres are available now-a-days. These fibres are mainly divided into two categories natural and man made. They are also categorized by the generations as they were produced in the different years and known as first generation, second generation, third generation or fourth generation fibres.

The fibres generated first were the natural fibres. In this category cotton, wool, silk and all other animal and plant fibres are included. These fibres were introduced first 4000 years back but their uses were continued till 1940. All these fibres are known as first generation fibres. Very delicate handling is needed for these fibres. Fibres like silks and cottons have not good resistance against moths, wrinkles, wear and washings. So discovery of durable fibres was a greater need and about one century ago first synthesized fibres Rayon/Nylon were produced. These fibres are cheaper in comparison with natural ones. The development of these new fibres opened up fibre application to the various fields like medicine, aeronautics, home furnishing and modern apparels. Fibre engineers produced many new fibres by combining new synthetic fibres with the natural ones.

In the year 1664 the first attempt was done to make artificial fibre, but success was achieved after 200 years only. A Swiss chemist Audemars first patented artificial fibre in England in 1855. He produced that by dissolving the fibrous inner bark of the mulberry tree and produced cellulose by modifying it chemically. He made threads from the solution by dripping needle in the solution and then drawing them out. His attempt was good but he could not copy the silkworm. He had done experiments with the solution similar to Audemars solution.

French chemist Hilaire de Chardonnet was the first one to produce artificial silk commercially in the year 1889. Later on he was known as father of rayon industry because he was the first to produce rayon commercially on large scales.

All the attempts of producing artificial silk failed till the year 1900 but in the year 1910 Samuel Courtaulds and Co. Ltd, formed the American Viscose Company and did production of rayon.

Arthur D. Little of Boston made a film from acetate which is a cellulosic product in the year 1983 and in the year 1910 Henry Dreyfus and Camille made toilet articles and motion picture film from acetate in Switzerland. In the year 1924 Celanese Company made fibre from the acetate and it was the very first use of acetate in the textile industry. At that time the demand of rayon was high because it was available on the half of the price than raw silk to the textile manufacturers so U.S. rayon production flourished to meet those higher demands.

About Nylon

The miracle fibre called Nylon was invented in the September 1931 at the research laboratory of DuPont Company. They saw giant molecules of these polymers when they were working on Nylon ’66’ and Nylon ‘6’.

Nylon is completely synthetic fibre obtained from petrochemicals and is very different from Rayon and Acetate which are made up of cellulosic material of plants. The discovery of Nylon started a new era of manufactured fibres.

A change in life style

In the year 1939 commercial production of nylon was started by DuPont. In the very beginning on the experimental basis they used nylon in parachute fabric, in women’s hosiery and in sewing thread. Nylon stockings were firstly visible to the public at the San Francisco Exposition in February 1939.

At the times of war, Asian silk was replaced by nylon in parachutes. The other uses of Nylon are in military supplies, ponchos, tyres, ropes, tents and in the high grade paper to make U.S. currency. At the time of war cotton was the most commonly used fibre and its uses were more then 80% than any other fibres. Another 20% is shared by wool and other manufactured fibres. August 1945 was the time of ending of war, at that time cotton shares 75% of the fibre market and rise of 15% was seen in the market of manufactured fibres.

One more thought while we have a second, Steve reminded me that we have even more to share on our other web pages. When you’re ready read more on this link: Webbing suppliers.

Are you curious about new uses of synthetic or polyester web?

Preface note first — let me explain — today’s excerpts come from these really fun bits that we found in our morning surf online. As you will see, the information we found today will be of great interest to those who love posts has tons of info in our favorite scientific arenas.

We have even more — outrageous as it may seem — to share on our main site. So if you’d love better detailed content, then click this little link: Two-inch seat belt webbing.

Now onto our post:
Salutations my reader, Roger Howard here, your commercial fabrics guy. My team and I are ready to deliver to you a great industrial fabrics article with you.

Two-inch seat belt webbing material is what I’m all about, so it may be a bit of a surprise to you that I only found two topics of interest today: automotive webbing and web distributor.

As always, if you prefer to watch videos, that’s no problem! I’m building a list of relevant videos that will give a bit more depth and insight to commercial fabric manufacturing processes, and plan to include those in my posts in the coming days.

I have to say that I prefer the written word (because I like to study this type of material line by line, and take notes on how I’ll add new options for our clients’ real-world webbing applications!).

That’s enough delay, right? So here is what I am eager to share today. This article provides great background and insight to the science behind narrow seat belt webbing:

It’s just the way it is in the polyester manufacturing business sector that entreprenuers like us need to network and build out our relationships each and every week. I was at our local Chamber of Commerce conference last month and met a new member recently transferred from the west coast. He’s recently worked directly with narrow material matters in the American Fiber Manufacturers Association, Inc. (AFMA).

I must admit — to be sincere — that I actually had not came across the American Fiber Manufacturers Association (humiliating, yes, I know). It seemed like a perfect opportunity to share an overview with you all (on the outside chance that a few of you may be curious about the AFMA as was I.

Read more about Two-inch seat belt webbing

Did you know our humble polyester molecule dates back nearly 100 years??

Hi! To all our followers! As always, I’m your commercial fabrics guy, eager to drop a few lines about truly interesting textile process and procedure concepts.

Your compatriot Roger Howard here writing clever insights for you — indeed, I am the prolific commercial fabrics guy) — and ready to share amazin textiles data with you!

Correct my friend, this is your commercial fabrics guy, and I have yet another textiles historic insight to send your way. Are you new?? Great!! Hello! Roger Howard here, I’m your intrepid author, eager to get into all we’ve found today.

1.5 inch seat belt webbing is what we’ve worked on all these years, so it may seem odd that I only found two topics of interest today: material polyester and strap polyester.

Before I go too far — let me explain — today’s insights come from experts’ posts that my assistant and I uncovered in today’s careful examination of the “Interwebs”.

Truth be told, the information we found today will be of great interest to those who love posts with lots of details in the world of commercial science.

Listen, would you rather see videos? No problem! I’m building a list of relevant videos that will give a bit more depth and insight to commercial fabric manufacturing processes, and plan to include those in my posts in the coming days.

To be clear, I prefer the written word (because I like to study this type of material line by line, and take notes on how I’ll add new options for our clients’ real-world webbing applications!).

Let me be honest, my friends, we have even more to share on our primary site. When you’re ready for better details, take a peek here: 1.5 inch seat belt webbing.

Without further delay, here is what I am eager to share today. This article provides great background and insight to the science behind 1 inch web material:

Durability and strength of the material make it a sought after option for many businesses across the globe. Simple things, like the way the woven material can be preshrunk during the manufacturing process makes it a valuable asset to business that require a fabric with consistently non-shrinking properties.
Allergy sufferers love polyester fabric for its non-allergic properties. In fact, many people prefer the material for making quilts, pillows, bed sheets (among other uses) for this target audience that is willing to pay more to get the relief they need in hypoallergenic materials.

Source: http://textilesblogs.blogspot.com/ /2016/05/whats-most-effective-way-to-make.html

Recent Research Confirms All Of This: It’s No Secret That… Manufacturing Processes Are Critical for Polyester Polymerization.
Initial Fabrication

A catalyst is mixed with ethylene glycol and dimethyl terephthalate at a temperature of 150-210 degrees centigrade. The resulting substance is then combined with terephthalic acid. It is allowed to boil at a temperature of 280 degrees centigrade where it forms polyester which is in liquid form. The liquid is allowed to pass through a machine that makes the filaments, tow, fiberfill or staple.

Drying

The liquid polyester ribbons are allowed to cool until hard enough. They are then cut into tiny pieces to ensure that no air was trapped in the filament during the manufacturing process.

Spinning

Melting of the chips is done at 260-270 degree centigrade, and the resulting solution passes through a spinneret which is metallic and has tiny holes. The holes are of various sizes and forms’ depending on what the company is looking to achieve. It is during this process that different chemicals are added for instance those that will make the final product non-flammable.

After the spinning process is complete, the fiber is allowed to dry. Specialized machines do the draw of fiber. The fibers are soft, and it is at this stage that texturing, twisting and other processes take place. The fiber is then packaged into a form that it will be easier to weave it into the desired material.

The manufacturing process of tow is quite different from that of filament manufacture.in that the spinneret machine has smaller holes. The tow fiber that is produced is stored in containers which are specifically for cooling. With technology advancements and the fact that polyester blends easily with natural materials like cotton, wool among others makes it the best choice for many fashion designers.

Correct my friends, our team first shared this detailed history on our Blogspot account, so feel free to visit our site and read that real version from which this came.

Polyester Historical Notes – Read more here -> 1.5 inch seat belt webbing

When politicians fight people tune-in

Darling readers!2-inch webbing roll is actually on my mind, and right now I (Roger Howard, of course!) bring you yet another very-nearly-brilliant post on narrow material my aim being to serve you with various awesome reads and connect you with some great resources.

* BUT * before we get into all that … I have a hot political segment to publish!

And you’ve in all probability * never * come across one such as this … because when politicians fight people tune-in. I’m describing more than just furious words. The dudes in this circumstance are buddies; you’ll see exactly how they had a go toe-to-toe in this brawl …

I tuned into this because one of the two was my director back in the day when I first got out of college. So if perhaps you have enthusiasm in political malicious talk and insider news, then read on.

Yep, high stakes, high tension, legislative concerns concentrated on commercial cargo ships:

“How the Harbor District Found Itself in the Middle of Humboldt’s Most Bitter Political Fight


Author: Ryan Burns
Source: https://lostcoastoutpost.com/2016/apr/29/how-harbor-district-found-itself-center-countys-mo/

Last week, two elected officials got into a face-to-face, toe-to-toe, “let’s take this outside”-style argument during a break in a Planning Commission meeting. This wasn’t a personal beef (the men each told the Outpost afterward that they consider each other friends). Nor was it about a property dispute that affects either man directly.

No, the spat boiled over from a long-simmering political dispute over management of Humboldt Bay. Former Planning Commissioner Dennis Mayo and current Harbor Commissioner Richard Marks (the officials in last week’s quarrel) stand on separate sides of a philosophical and tactical divide that has gradually expanded to define Humboldt County’s most bitter political struggle — whether we should wait for big, blue-collar industries to arrive on our shores via sea and rail, or start allowing other businesses to use that land.

With a 5-1 vote the Planning Commission sided with the Mayo contingent, which envisions Humboldt Bay as a major industrialized seaport offering international shipping and a rebuilt (or freshly built) railroad connecting our county to the national rail network.

Marks and his fellow Harbor Commissioners, meanwhile, are pursuing a more economically diversified approach. At last week’s meeting, Division 5 Commissioner Patrick Higgins told the Planning Commission that the Harbor District almost went broke trying to market our harbor to industrial shipping interests. The time has come, he said, to loosen zoning restrictions on the vacant and deteriorating land surrounding the bay so other types of businesses can move in.

The ultimate decision on this matter lies with the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors, which will have to decide which side of that political chasm to stand on. And while their decision might not dictate the future of Humboldt Bay, it could have significant impacts on property owners and infrastructure around the harbor.

Yes indeed, there is much more where that came from.

Now — jumping ahead to things related to my favorite topic (web distributor) — check this out ->>

In our nerd rating range of 1-10,
this is clearly an 11!

Strangely enough, only a few of you will love this as deeply as do I.
None the less, suffice to say, this is at the deep end of the scientific pool.

Truth be told, the scientists featured here are personal friends of our company in general, and me in particular. By all means, take a few minutes to read through these and let us know if your business works in a realm that can leverage this approach.

Modifying the UV Blocking Effect of Polyester Fabric
Source: http://trj.sagepub.com/content/74/6/469.short

Marija Gorenšek
Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, Department of Textiles, University of Ljubljana, SI-1001 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Franci Sluga
Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, Department of Textiles, University of Ljubljana, SI-1001 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Abstract

The influence of conventional acid and alkaline high temperature dyeing procedures on fabric construction is investigated. The effects of weave construction, orange, red, and blue disperse dyes, double layers of fabrics, and UV absorber on the ultraviolet protection factors (UPF) of polyester fabrics are the topics of this research. A spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere is used to measure the uv transmittance of polyester fabrics according to an AATCC test. Small differences in the weight of fabrics after blind dyeing procedures already influence the uv transmittance of fabrics. Pale orange and blue dyed fabrics show a high enough UPF, while a pale red dyed fabric does not reach such values. Deep dyed and double layered fabrics and fabrics aftertreated with a UV absorber reach high UPF values.

. . .

“Influence of reactive dyes on ultraviolet protection of cotton knitted fabrics with different fabric constructions

Source: http://trj.sagepub.com/content/86/5/512.abstract

Wai-yin Wong, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Jimmy Kwok-cheong Lam, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Chi-wai Kan, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Ron Postle, School of Chemistry, University of New South Wales, Australia

Dr Chi-wai Kan, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong. Email: tccwk [at] polyu.edu.hk

Abstract
Influence of reactive dyes on ultraviolet protection of cotton knitted fabrics with different fabric constructions

Wai-yin Wong1
Jimmy Kwok-cheong Lam1
Chi-wai Kan1⇑
Ron Postle2

1Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
2School of Chemistry, University of New South Wales, Australia

Dr Chi-wai Kan, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong. Email: tccwk [at] polyu.edu.hk

Abstract

The influence of coloration on ultraviolet (UV) protection of cotton knitted fabrics with different knit structures incorporated with the three major stitch types, namely knit, tuck and miss stitches, are studied in four approaches.

The effects of color depth and knit structures on the ultraviolet protection factor (UPF) of fabrics are investigated. The influences of hue and color depth on the UPF of fabrics are also compared. Since UV protection offered by dyes mainly depends on their chemical structures, the UPF and color strength of fabrics colored by reactive dyes that varied in reactive groups, such as mono-functional and bi-functional reactive dyes, are examined. The correlations between UPF and the CIELAB color coordinates, color strength (K/Ssum), are analyzed. The results show that light-colored fabrics with compact structures achieve similar or even better UV protection than the dark-colored fabrics with loose structures.

This implies that color property might not be a reliable indicator for UV protection of knitted fabrics and the effect of coloration on UV protection is affected by fabric construction. The results also denote that the chemical structure of reactive dyes affects the UV protection of fabrics in a qualitative approach that depends on the unique ultraviolet radiation blocking ability of the chemical constituents. Among the color coordinates investigated, only lightness (L*) and K/Ssum are found to be correlated with the UPF of the fabrics, but the strength of correlations is not very strong. This is because the fabric characteristics that have significant impacts of UV protection are mostly not involved in the measurement of color properties.

There are more for 2-inch webbing roll. If You interested click on the 2-inch webbing roll.

Who could say no to a quick peek at some amzing polyester info?

A shout out to all my beloved readers and fans of 1.5 inch seat belt webbing!

I, Roger Howard, have come with yet one other unusual write up that is going to leave you eagerly watching for more (if I may say so myself). While I spent most of my time this week dealing with our Industrial Shipping Demonstration 2016 webbing material exhibit, my extra hours after that were all invested in delving deep within the enigma and exhilaration of what is trending in the polyester manufacturer and webbing company categories. Incidentally, we’re still collecting any and all pictures, videos, and technical designs (especially trucking tarps and cargo net webbing). Really eager to build a gallery that will leave our disciples spell bound and merrily clicking thru our gallery.

Oh, and if you have captivating tall tales and effective applications of narrow seat belt webbing, of course send me an email so we can talk about it.

Undoubtedly I could talk for hours on all these matters, but let’s buckle up and get into the legitimate set of issues, okay? You are going to love this current post (just a little bawdy, but that’s my style).

It’s a fait accompli in the poly web material business sector that entreprenuers like us need to network and build out our relationships each and every week. I was at our territorial Chamber of Commerce meeting two days ago and met a new member recently relocated from Washington, DC. He’s performed closely with poly web material matters in the Fiber Economics Bureau (FEB) for many years.

To be truthful, I must confess that I certainly never was aware of the Fiber Economics Bureau (humiliating, yes, I know). It seemed like a perfect opportunity to share an overview with you all (on the outside chance that a few of you may be curious about the “FEB” as was I :-).

Citation / Source: http://www.fibersource.com/feb/feb1.htm
The Exclusive Source of Information on Manufactured Fibers

ince 1935, the Fiber Economics Bureau (FEB) has been the ONLY source of direct statistics on the United States manufactured fiber industry and its products — acrylic, nylon, polyester, olefin, rayon, glass fiber, and others. Our long-established contacts with fiber producers and our confidential handling of proprietary data has earned us respect and cooperation from manufactured fiber producers around the world.

Our two monthly publications, the Fiber Organon and the Manufactured Fiber Review, present the latest information on industry trends in easy-to-read tables and charts. This data on production, shipments, capacities, stocks, imports-exports, mill use and other key industry statistics is made available 15 to 30 days after the close of each month.

Our premier data service is the Manufactured Fiber Handbook. It is distributed in page-by-page updates in a loose-leaf binder format designed for those who need the most timely, comprehensive, and in-depth data on the industry. The service includes details on primary and secondary end use shipments. Special data compilations are available for subscribers covering years prior to the start of new subscriptions.

Our annual World Directory of Manufactured Fiber Producers is the only directory with global coverage. It contains over 1,500 fiber producer listings in 72 countries. For each producer we provide details on addresses, telephone/fax numbers, plant locations, products produced, and trade names.

As you can imagine, there are VOLUMES more that could be shared about the FEB, but I’ll cease fire there. You’re 100% welcome to visit their site and dig deeper, becuase they have a huge library of truly fabulous info.

Since seatbelt webbing work is my professional life, I did a bit of a dig about on their website, and it made me remember a textbook that I loved from university days. So up I went into my attic storage, and pulled down all five cardboard crates full of notebooks, engineering posters, magazines, and books.

Specifically, this is the one that I dug out. It’s the one that got me hooked on the industrial webbing vertical market, and, to be honest, I’ve not looked back since then.

You can see a bit more detail on Amazon.com, yet here is a very nice summary:


Modern Polyesters: Chemistry and Technology of Polyesters and Copolyesters 1st Edition
“, by John Scheirs (Editor), Timothy E. Long (Editor)

ISBN-13: 978-0471498568

ISBN-10: 0471498564

Description:
Provides an overview of the family of polyester polymers which comprise an important group of plastics that span the range of commodity polymers to engineering resins. It describes the preparation, properties and applications of polyesters. Readers will also find details on polyester-based elastomers, biodegradable aliphatic polyester, liquid crystal polyesters and unsaturated polyesters for glass-reinforced composites.

Presents an overview of the most recent developments.
Explores synthesis, catalysts, processes, properties and applications.
Looks at emerging polyester materials as well as existing ones.
Written by foremost experts from both academia and industry, ensuring that both fundamentals and practical applications are covered.

Editorial Reviews
“…a very informative book.” (IEEE Electrical Insulation Magazine, March/April 2006)

“…for those involved in research or in manufacturing or polyester processing, this book will be essential.” (E-STREAMS, August 2004)

“…examines the chemistry and technology of polyester and copolyesters and illustrates the diversity and importance of these materials…” (Materials World, Thursday 1 January 2004)

“…successful in presenting and discussing its technical topics…an excellent collection of data…an essential and invaluable resource…” (Materials World, Vol 12(8), August 2004)

“…informative…written clearly in a consistent style…should be a key acquisition for any research chemist seeking to investigate polyesters…” (Applied Organometallic Chemistry, Vol.19, No.1, January 2005)

From the Back Cover
Polyesters are one of the most important class of polymers in use today. Hundreds of polyesters exist although only about a dozen are of commercial significance. Polyesters are ubiquitous materials in modern life and are used in diverse applications from drink bottles and photographic film to shirts and fabrics. This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference and includes the following sections:

Historical development
Polymerization & polycondensation
Polyester types
Fibers, compounds and modifying additives
Depolymerization & degradation
Liquid crystal polyesters
Unsaturated polyesters

Comprehensive coverage of polyester resins with an emphasis on their structure-property relationships is provided. Polyester types covered in detail include: PET, PET copolymers, PCT, PCTG, PCTA, PBT, PEN, PTT, cyclic polyester oligomers, LCP and UP’s. The latest advances in polyesters are described along with current and emerging application areas.

This work contains more than 20 contributions with experts from both academia and industry from North America, Europe, the Far East and Australia.

An essential book for plastics engineers, polymer chemists, material scientists and those working in the plastics manufacturing and processing industries that deal with polyester resins.

Amazon Product Details

Hardcover: 788 pages
Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (November 21, 2003)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0471498564
ISBN-13: 978-0471498568
Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 2 x 9.2 inches
Shipping Weight: 3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,318,921 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
#212 in Books > Engineering & Transportation > Engineering > Chemical > Plastics
#663 in Books > Engineering & Transportation > Engineering > Materials & Material Science > Polymers & Textiles
#1022 in Books > Science & Math > Chemistry > Industrial & Technical

One fast wrap-up note — let me explain — today’s insights come from simple dialogs at a networking meeting. You can get the same results by taking the same actions. In fact, you can get solid business insights by making opportunities to talk with business professionals in your area today.

Believe it or not, we have even more to share on our primary site. When you’re ready for better details, click this little link: 1.5 inch seat belt webbing.

1.5 inch seat belt webbing is what it’s really all about, am I right? That’s the one fabric we all have in common. To be direct, if you’re not in our vertical market, then this entire article is likely something you’ll need to just send to a different department, right?

Merci beaucoup my precious visitors and enthusiasts of narrow fabric seat belt web! I value your focus in studying our post, and we trust you are consistently watching for much more:-). Possibly I an excessive amount of of my time working on assignments like our Commercial Shipping Expo 2016 webbing material presentation, but as I specified previously, I do my best daily to keep an hour or two available to invest in finding intriguing info trending up in the material polyester and webbing manufacturer genres.

To be obvious, we’re still amassing any and all pictures, videos, and electronic illustratings (especially trucking tarps and cargo net webbing). We appreciate your help to build a gallery that will serve to help our fans want to happily return to our gallery.

Simply share your entertaining anecdotes and effective utilizations of 1 inch web material!

Obviously I could speak for hours on all these things, nevertheless…

PS – Listen, for those who got a lot out of the content today, will you help me please and be honest as to the extent this is aligned with your interests?

One last request, be sure to note if you can jump on a call with me to record an interview on cargo webbing or strap polyester. I’d personally love your help in explaining these ideas with a few pictures of narrow fabric seat belt web.

Watch this space my friends… because my assistant and I have more articles in the queue nearly ready to share in the days to come. Cheers!

What’s the most effective way to make polyester? Check it out…

Amazingly, you guessed it, this is your commercial fabrics guy, and I have yet another compelling textiles post to lay on you. For those who’re new: Hello! Roger Howard here, I’m your intrepid author, eager to get into all we’ve found today.

Narrow fabric seat belt web is what we’ve worked on all these years, so it may be a bit of a surprise to you that I only uncovered a few cool things of interest this afternoon: industrial strap and web strapping.

Before I go too far — let me explain — today’s insights come from experts’ posts that my assistant and I uncovered in our morning surf of the web. In fact, the information we found today will be of great interest to those who love posts with lots of details in the scientific arena.

Believe it or not, we have even more to share on our branded site. When you’re ready for better details, take a peek here: Read more info.

Hey, do you prefer to watch videos? No problem! I’m building a list of relevant videos that will give a bit more depth and insight to commercial fabric manufacturing processes, and plan to include those in my posts in the coming days.

To be honest, I prefer the written word (because I like to study this type of material line by line, and take notes on how I’ll add new options for our clients’ real-world webbing applications!).

Without further delay, here is what I am eager to share today. This article provides great background and insight to the science behind narrow seat belt webbing:

https://www.igotbiz.com/rosemontbelt

Correct indeed, I originally shared this detailed history on our Blogspot account, so feel free to visit our site and read the original info.

Polyester material creation overview

A strong woven fabric was needed by the industrial corporations at the turn of the century. The demand was loud and clear for a product based on a versatile component that could be reliably used in manufacturing and cargo transportation.

Today we know that most modern webbing is made of synthetic fibers such as polyester, but try to remember that is was not always that way. Cotton webbing and wool webbing used to be quite common. However, growing industries cried out for webbing that was both light and strong, with high breaking strengths suitable to all their needs.

Science and technology opened a door to a new molecule that clearly met all the needs of the market.

Polyester industry dates back in the 1920s when W.H. Carothers was contracted by the U.S. based company E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. to research large molecules and synthetic fibers. The research led to the discovery of nylon fabric. In the 1930s to early 1940s, Calico Printers Association and Co., a British owned company, further studied the work of W.H. Carothers and discovered ethylene, which paved the way to creation of polyester fibers.

E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. bought the rights to produce the fiber in the U.S.A. and renamed it Dacron. The company carried out extensive research and came up with different and diverse polyester fibers. The polyester industry has evolved over the years and has many varied uses. There are two types of polyester, namely PET (polyethylene terephthalate), PCDT (poly-1,4-cyclohexylene-dimethylene terephthalate).

Here Are The Ways Polyester Is Put Into Use: Read more info

You’ve likely never seen one like this…

Dear scholars! narrow fabric seat belt web is on my mind, and right now I (Roger Howard, of course!) bring you still one more very-nearly-brilliant report on polyester distributor my aim being to serve you with some awesome reads and connect you with various great materials.

* BUT * before we enter everything … I have a hot political piece to share!

And you’ve probably * never * come across one such as this … because while politicians fight people tune-in. I’m referring to more than merely ill-tempered words. The men in this situation are buddies; you’ll see how they had a go toe-to-toe here in this brawl …

I tuned into this simply because one of the two was my boss back then when I first got out of college. So if quite possibly you have curiosity in bureaucratic malicious talk and insider news, then continue reading.

That’s right, high stakes, high stress, legislative matters focused on industrial shipping:

“How the Harbor District Found Itself in the Middle of Humboldt’s Most Bitter Political Fight


Author: Ryan Burns

<< Read the full article >>

Who could say no to a quick peek at some amzing polyester info?

A shout out to all my beloved readers and fans of 1.5 inch seat belt webbing!

I, Roger Howard, have come with yet one other unusual write up that is going to leave you eagerly watching for more (if I may say so myself). While I spent most of my time this week dealing with our Industrial Shipping Demonstration 2016 webbing material exhibit, my extra hours after that were all invested in delving deep within the enigma and exhilaration of what is trending in the polyester manufacturer and webbing company categories. Incidentally, we’re still collecting any and all pictures, videos, and technical designs (especially trucking tarps and cargo net webbing). Really eager to build a gallery that will leave our disciples spell bound and merrily clicking thru our gallery.

Oh, and if you have captivating tall tales and effective applications of narrow seat belt webbing, of course send me an email so we can talk about it.

Undoubtedly I could talk for hours on all these matters, but let’s buckle up and get into the legitimate set of issues, okay? You are going to love this current post (just a little bawdy, but that’s my style).

It’s a fait accompli in the poly web material business sector that entreprenuers like us need to network and build out our relationships each and every week. I was at our territorial Chamber of Commerce meeting two days ago and met a new member recently relocated from Washington, DC. He’s performed closely with poly web material matters in the Fiber Economics Bureau (FEB) for many years.

To be truthful, I must confess that I certainly never was aware of the Fiber Economics Bureau (humiliating, yes, I know). It seemed like a perfect opportunity to share an overview with you all (on the outside chance that a few of you may be curious about the “FEB” as was I :-).

Citation / Source: http://www.fibersource.com/feb/feb1.htm
The Exclusive Source of Information on Manufactured Fibers

ince 1935, the Fiber Economics Bureau (FEB) has been the ONLY source of direct statistics on the United States manufactured fiber industry and its products — acrylic, nylon, polyester, olefin, rayon, glass fiber, and others. Our long-established contacts with fiber producers and our confidential handling of proprietary data has earned us respect and cooperation from manufactured fiber producers around the world.

Our two monthly publications, the Fiber Organon and the Manufactured Fiber Review, present the latest information on industry trends in easy-to-read tables and charts. This data on production, shipments, capacities, stocks, imports-exports, mill use and other key industry statistics is made available 15 to 30 days after the close of each month.

Our premier data service is the Manufactured Fiber Handbook. It is distributed in page-by-page updates in a loose-leaf binder format designed for those who need the most timely, comprehensive, and in-depth data on the industry. The service includes details on primary and secondary end use shipments. Special data compilations are available for subscribers covering years prior to the start of new subscriptions.

Our annual World Directory of Manufactured Fiber Producers is the only directory with global coverage. It contains over 1,500 fiber producer listings in 72 countries. For each producer we provide details on addresses, telephone/fax numbers, plant locations, products produced, and trade names.

As you can imagine, there are VOLUMES more that could be shared about the FEB, but I’ll cease fire there. You’re 100% welcome to visit their site and dig deeper, becuase they have a huge library of truly fabulous info.

Since seatbelt webbing work is my professional life, I did a bit of a dig about on their website, and it made me remember a textbook that I loved from university days. So up I went into my attic storage, and pulled down all five cardboard crates full of notebooks, engineering posters, magazines, and books.

Specifically, this is the one that I dug out. It’s the one that got me hooked on the industrial webbing vertical market, and, to be honest, I’ve not looked back since then.

You can see a bit more detail on Amazon.com, yet here is a very nice summary:


Modern Polyesters: Chemistry and Technology of Polyesters and Copolyesters 1st Edition
“, by John Scheirs (Editor), Timothy E. Long (Editor)

ISBN-13: 978-0471498568

ISBN-10: 0471498564

Description:
Provides an overview of the family of polyester polymers which comprise an important group of plastics that span the range of commodity polymers to engineering resins. It describes the preparation, properties and applications of polyesters. Readers will also find details on polyester-based elastomers, biodegradable aliphatic polyester, liquid crystal polyesters and unsaturated polyesters for glass-reinforced composites.

Presents an overview of the most recent developments.
Explores synthesis, catalysts, processes, properties and applications.
Looks at emerging polyester materials as well as existing ones.
Written by foremost experts from both academia and industry, ensuring that both fundamentals and practical applications are covered.

Editorial Reviews
“…a very informative book.” (IEEE Electrical Insulation Magazine, March/April 2006)

“…for those involved in research or in manufacturing or polyester processing, this book will be essential.” (E-STREAMS, August 2004)

“…examines the chemistry and technology of polyester and copolyesters and illustrates the diversity and importance of these materials…” (Materials World, Thursday 1 January 2004)

“…successful in presenting and discussing its technical topics…an excellent collection of data…an essential and invaluable resource…” (Materials World, Vol 12(8), August 2004)

“…informative…written clearly in a consistent style…should be a key acquisition for any research chemist seeking to investigate polyesters…” (Applied Organometallic Chemistry, Vol.19, No.1, January 2005)

From the Back Cover
Polyesters are one of the most important class of polymers in use today. Hundreds of polyesters exist although only about a dozen are of commercial significance. Polyesters are ubiquitous materials in modern life and are used in diverse applications from drink bottles and photographic film to shirts and fabrics. This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference and includes the following sections:

Historical development
Polymerization & polycondensation
Polyester types
Fibers, compounds and modifying additives
Depolymerization & degradation
Liquid crystal polyesters
Unsaturated polyesters

Comprehensive coverage of polyester resins with an emphasis on their structure-property relationships is provided. Polyester types covered in detail include: PET, PET copolymers, PCT, PCTG, PCTA, PBT, PEN, PTT, cyclic polyester oligomers, LCP and UP’s. The latest advances in polyesters are described along with current and emerging application areas.

This work contains more than 20 contributions with experts from both academia and industry from North America, Europe, the Far East and Australia.

An essential book for plastics engineers, polymer chemists, material scientists and those working in the plastics manufacturing and processing industries that deal with polyester resins.

Amazon Product Details

Hardcover: 788 pages
Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (November 21, 2003)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0471498564
ISBN-13: 978-0471498568
Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 2 x 9.2 inches
Shipping Weight: 3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,318,921 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
#212 in Books > Engineering & Transportation > Engineering > Chemical > Plastics
#663 in Books > Engineering & Transportation > Engineering > Materials & Material Science > Polymers & Textiles
#1022 in Books > Science & Math > Chemistry > Industrial & Technical

One fast wrap-up note — let me explain — today’s insights come from simple dialogs at a networking meeting. You can get the same results by taking the same actions. In fact, you can get solid business insights by making opportunities to talk with business professionals in your area today.

Believe it or not, we have even more to share on our primary site. When you’re ready for better details, click this little link: 1.5 inch seat belt webbing.

1.5 inch seat belt webbing is what it’s really all about, am I right? That’s the one fabric we all have in common. To be direct, if you’re not in our vertical market, then this entire article is likely something you’ll need to just send to a different department, right?

Merci beaucoup my precious visitors and enthusiasts of narrow fabric seat belt web! I value your focus in studying our post, and we trust you are consistently watching for much more:-). Possibly I an excessive amount of of my time working on assignments like our Commercial Shipping Expo 2016 webbing material presentation, but as I specified previously, I do my best daily to keep an hour or two available to invest in finding intriguing info trending up in the material polyester and webbing manufacturer genres.

To be obvious, we’re still amassing any and all pictures, videos, and electronic illustratings (especially trucking tarps and cargo net webbing). We appreciate your help to build a gallery that will serve to help our fans want to happily return to our gallery.

Simply share your entertaining anecdotes and effective utilizations of 1 inch web material!

Obviously I could speak for hours on all these things, nevertheless…

PS – Listen, for those who got a lot out of the content today, will you help me please and be honest as to the extent this is aligned with your interests?

One last request, be sure to note if you can jump on a call with me to record an interview on cargo webbing or strap polyester. I’d personally love your help in explaining these ideas with a few pictures of narrow fabric seat belt web.

Watch this space my friends… because my assistant and I have more articles in the queue nearly ready to share in the days to come. Cheers!